Last updated: 15.34 November 12th 2019

With an election looming and Brexit delayed, a lot of uncertainty for travellers with British passports looks set to remain into 2020. We have compiled a quick guide explaining what Brexit could mean for you as a business traveller.

The Impacts and Implications of Brexit on Business Travel

Many are wondering the potential impacts and implications that Brexit may have on the Business Travel Industry.

Understanding what Brexit is can be difficult, however it’s important to know how it may affect your travel plans.

We sat down with our Commercial Director David Bishop and our Consulting Manager Aman Pourkarimi to help you recognise what may lie ahead in the near future…

No Brexit Deal

If the UK leaves the EU without a deal, British passport holders will be considered third-country nationals by countries within the Schengen area.

Rules for Passports: No Deal

The rules for travel to most* countries in Europe will change if the UK leaves the European Union (EU) with no deal.

New rules will apply for travel to Europe if the UK leaves the EU without a deal.

You should have at least 6 months left on an adult or child passport to travel to most countries in Europe (not including Ireland).

If you renewed your current passport before the previous one expired, extra months may have been added to its expiry date. Any extra months on your passport over 10 years may not count towards the 6 months needed.

The new rules will apply for travel to and between most countries in Europe. These are:

Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Vatican City.

The new rules do not apply when travelling to Ireland.

Source: GOV.UK

VISAs: No Deal

The European Parliament has confirmed that UK travellers won’t need a visa to travel to the EU after Brexit for short-term business or leisure trips, even if the UK leaves without a deal. UK citizens will be able to visit the EU for up to 90 days within a 180-day period without a visa.

Source: ABTA

Driving License: No Deal

As long as you have a full UK driving licence, you don’t currently need an additional licence to drive in the EU. This will change in a no-deal scenario for certain countries. Depending on your destination, and the length of your stay, UK licence holders looking to drive in the EU after a no-deal Brexit may need to apply for an International Driving Permit.

Full details about International Driving Permits, including what permit you need for each country can be found at gov.uk

There are a number of different permits available for different countries within the EU, so you should check carefully which permit is required for each country you intend to drive within, as you may need more than one permit to comply with the law.

If required, International Driving Permits cost £5.50 and are available directly from the Post Office, you can find your nearest branch here.

The Government is also advising that you will need a GB sticker for your car when driving in the EU after Brexit.

Source: ABTA

European Health Insurance Card & Travel Insurance: No Deal

The European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) allows any EU citizen to access state medical care when they are travelling in another EU country. In the event of a no-deal Brexit, UK registered EHICs will no longer be valid.

Source: ABTA

Data Roaming: No Deal

Under EU rules, the cost of making calls, sending messages or using the internet on your phone in the EU is the same in the UK. If the UK leaves without a deal these rules will no longer apply – however, some UK companies have said they may continue to offer this benefit to their customers. Before you travel, check with your mobile phone provider about the costs of using your phone in the EU.

Source: ABTA

Agreed Brexit Deal

If the UK leaves with the current proposed deal, then there will be a transition period until the end of 2020, in which little will actually change. EU citizens and UK nationals will continue to be able to travel freely with a passport or identity card until the end of the transition period in 2020.

Source: ABTA

Timeframe Extended

If the Government has agreed a deal before 31 January, the UK will enter a transition period, meaning everything will continue to remain the same during that period and you can continue to travel as you do now.

Please note – all information was correct at the time this information was compiled.

We endeavour to update the information on a regular basis, but please be sure to check the latest news and changes as they happen.